Level 2: Fatto, detto, visto et al.

A1: Love (2)

A2: Italian Cuisine (2)

B. Action Words

essere  to be

Avere: Passato prossimo

Fare + andare

C. Words

Technology

Preview

D. Rules

Negatives (2)

Asking a question

E. Dialogue

La macedonia di Amos

Amos’ fruit salad

Words

F. Results & Preview

 

* * *

If you just want basic notions of the Italian language, continue with the next episode of Giulia, Giacomo and their friends (‘A1: Love’) and Spaghetti Aglio e Olio (‘A2: Italian Cuisine’). Then go onto Level 3.

Download the audio files from www.4elisa.com to your mobile devices and read the text several times while listening to the audio and looking at the English translation. Remember that it is not a sin to listen to the audio 10, 20 or even 50 times, it may be the smartest way!

If you are still serious about learning Italian, continue with section B, ‘Action Words’, section C, ‘Words’, section D, ‘Rules’, etc. On today’s menu: the second most important Italian word, essere to be. Immediately after discovering the present (sono-sei-è | siamo-siete-sono), you will make another trip into the past, discover the so-called passato prossimo and appreciate the power of the participio passato, the past participle. Please note that the past participle is one of the key elements of Italian grammar; as such, repetition is beauty.

The rest will be easy. You’ll soon know how to say never/ever, nothing/anything, nobody/anything and no more/anymore, as well as even how to ask questions. Level 2 ends with one of the most libidinous experiences in Italy: Amos’ fruit salad!

Listen to the audios until you understand every single word.

A1: Love (2)

Giacomo meets Luca, one of his best friends. They discuss his recent breakup with Giulia.

Giacomo: Ti rendi conto? Giulia mi ha lasciato. È convinta che io abbia una storia con Valeria.

G.: You know? Giulia left me. She’s convinced that I’m having a “fling” with Valeria.

Luca: È assurdo! Tu eri andato a lasciare lei perché l’avevano vista con Maurizio domenica scorsa, vero?

L.: That’s ridiculous! You were going to leave her because she’d been seen with Maurizio last Sunday, right?

Giacomo: Si, ma è stata più veloce di me. Ora è finita. Non ho più fiducia in lei. È tutto troppo complicato. Non siamo fatti l’uno per l’altra.

G.: Yes, but she was faster than me. Now it’s over. I can’t trust her anymore. It’s all too complicated. We’re not meant for each other.

Luca: Allora vuoi finirla con lei? Sei sicuro?

L.: So you want to break it off with her? Are you sure?

Giacomo: Sicurissimo. E poi non ho tempo per questo tipo di storie. La mia laurea è più importante. È fra sei settimane.

G.: Very sure. I don’t have time for this kind of stories. My studies are more important. Exams are in 6 weeks.

Luca: Non vedrai Giulia neanche alla festa di Sara sabato sera?

L.: You won’t even see Giulia at Sara’s party Saturday night?

Giacomo: No, tranquillo, andrò alla festa. Perché dovrei rinunciare a vedere i miei amici? Ma non guarderò Giulia e tantomeno le parlerò.

G.: No, don’t worry, I’ll go to the party. Why should I give up seeing my friends? But I won’t look at Giulia and even less talk to her.

 

Words

rendersi conto

to realize

ti rendi conto?

do you realize?

lasciare

to leave

essere convinto/-a

to be convinced

che io abbia (congiuntivo)

that I have

la storia

fling; history

assurdo

absurd; ridiculous

eri andato

you had gone

perché

because; why

l’avevano vista

she had been seen

domenica

Sunday

scorso/-a

last

vero? / non è vero?

isn’t it?

si

yes

è stata

she has been

veloce

quick, fast

più veloce di me

faster than me

ora

now

è finita

it’s over

avere fiducia in

to trust

tutto

everything, all

troppo

too

complicato

complicated

non siamo fatti

we are not made

l’uno per l’altra

for each other

allora

so, in that case

finirla con

to break it off with

sicuro/-a

sure

non ho tempo

I don’t have time

questo tipo di

this kind of

la mia laurea

my studies

più

more

importante

important

fra sei settimane

in 6 weeks

non vedrai

you won’t see

neanche

not even

alla festa

at the party

sabato sera

Saturday evening

tranquillo

don’t worry

andrò

I’ll go

dovrei

I would need to

rinunciare

to give up

vedere

to see

i miei amici

my friends

non guarderò

I won’t look at

tantomeno

even less

parlare

to talk, to speak

non le parlerò

I won’t talk to her

 

A2: Italian Cuisine (2)

Spaghetti Aglio e Olio’ is one of the Italian classics. The recipe is simple, but knowing some secrets will enhance your pleasure.

Per 4 persone: 400 g di spaghetti. Condimento: 3 spicchi d’aglio, 2 peperoncini, 50 ml di olio d’oliva, due cucchiai di prezzemolo tritato.

For 4 people: 400 g spaghetti. Sauce: 3 cloves of garlic, 2 chilli peppers, 50 ml of olive oil, two tablespoons of chopped parsley.

Mentre cuociono gli spaghetti (vedi Level 1), scaldare in una padella l’olio a fuoco vivo. Quando l’olio è bollente, abbassare il fuoco, aggiungere gli spicchi d’aglio e i peperoncini e cuocere per 5 minuti.

While the noodles are cooking (see Level 1), heat the oil in a pan over high heat. When the oil is hot, lower the heat, add the garlic and chilli and cook for 5 minutes.

Scolare gli spaghetti e metterli nella padella del condimento con il prezzemolo. Rigirare a fuoco lento per 2 minuti. Completare con un filo d’olio nel piatto.

Drain the spaghetti and put it in the pan with the sauce together with the parsley. Stir over low heat for 2 minutes. Complete with a drizzle of olive oil when served.

Variazione dello chef: far sfumare il condimento con un po’ di champagne; oppure: aggiungere alla fine qualche pinolo.

Chef’s variation: soften the sauce with a little champagne; or add a few pine nuts at the end.

 

 

Words

condimento

sauce

lo spicchio; pl: gli spicchi

slice; here: clove

l’aglio

garlic

il peperoncino

chilli pepper

il cucchiaio; pl: i cucchiai

tablespoon

il prezzemolo

parsley

tritato

chopped

cuocere

to cook

scaldare

to heat

a fuoco vivo

over high heat

quando

when

bollente

boiling, very hot

abbassare

to lower

il fuoco

fire; flame

aggiungere

to add

mettere

to put

nella padella

in the pan

rigirare

to stir, to turn around

a fuoco lento

over low heat

completare

to complete

un filo d’olio

a drizzle of oil

a crudo

here: cold

il piatto

plate

la variazione

variation

far sfumare

to soften

un po’ di

a little (of)

lo champagne

champagne

alla fine

at the end

qualche

some

il pinolo

pine nut

 

B. Action Words

essere  to be

Essere is the second most important word in Italian. As with avere, take all the time you need to get familiar with it. First learn every form, then memorize the 6-word sequence sono-sei-è | siamo-siete-sono.

Singular

(io)

sono

I

am

(tu)

sei

you

are

(lui/lei)

è

he/she

is

Plural

(noi)

siamo

we

are

(voi)

siete

you

are

(loro)

sono

they

are

 

Italian words usually put the stress on the second-last syllable: avere, ragione. Only a few words put the stress on the antepenultimate syllable (the third-to-last one), for example essere. From now on, we’ll underline the stressed vowels of these words (which are called sdrucciole). Example: vivere to live, spendere to spend.

The most important word of the sono-sei-è | siamo-siete-sono sextet is è he/she/it is. In any conversation, you’ll hear è at intervals of minutes, or even seconds. Here are some common words in combination with è:

È bellissimo!

That’s beautiful!

Non è fantastico?

Isn’t it fantastic?

Non è qui.

He/She is not here.

È lì.

He/She is there.

Non è grave.

It’s not serious.

È completamente pazzo.

He is completely crazy.

È completamente pazza.

She is completely crazy.

 

Now take a quick look at these words:

felice

happy

gentile

kind

dolce

sweet

crudele

cruel

divertente

funny

superficiale

superficial

 

and combine sono-sei-è | siamo-siete-sono with them. Note that the final –e vowel of these adjectives changes to –i in the plural (when the word refers to more than one person: we, you, they): felici, gentili, dolci, crudeli, divertenti and superficiali.

Sono felice.

I am happy.

Sei gentile.

You are kind.

È dolce.

He/She is sweet.

Siamo crudeli.

We are cruel.

Siete divertenti.

You are funny.

Sono superficiali.

They are superficial.

 

By combining sono-sei-è | siamo-siete-sono with felice etc., you get thirty-six new two-word sentences. Now add non and increase your repertoire to 216:

Non sono felice.

I am not happy.

Non sei gentile.

You are not kind.

Non è dolce.

He/She is not sweet.

Non siamo crudeli.

We are not cruel.

Non siete divertenti.

You are not funny.

Non sono superficiali.

They are not superficial.

 

{AUDIO}

Finally, take a first look at the all-important c’è | ci sono there is | there are and its variations in time:

Presente

c’è

there is

ci sono

there are

Imperfetto

c’era

there was/used to be

c’erano

there were/used to be

Passato prossimo

c’è stato/stata

there was

ci sono stati/state

there were

Futuro

ci sarà

there will be (sing.)

ci saranno

there will be (pl.)

Condizionale presente

ci sarebbe

there would be (sing.)

ci sarebbero

there would be (pl.)

 

We’ll come back to essere in Level 4.

Avere: Passato prossimo

Back to avere and back to the past: in a 10-minute dialogue, you will hear the single elements of the avere sextet ho-hai-ha | abbiamo-avete-hanno dozens of times. Most often, they appear in combination with so-called past participles. Past participles (now shown in blue) are, for example, done, said, worked, in Italian fatto, detto, lavorato. Coupled with avere, they form the passato prossimo, one of the Italian tenses to express the past. Like the imperfetto, it is usually translated by the English imperfect tense. Look how the passato prossimo fits into your timeline, occupying the same time slot as the imperfetto. You’ll discover later on the differences between the two.

Figure02_01

 

To get the past participles of Italian action words, you normally just change their endings. For the biggest group of action words, the first group, those ending in –are, just cut the –are and add –ato. Some examples:

Infinitive

Root

Past participle

to love

amare

am-

amato

loved

to excuse

scusare

scus-

scusato

excused

to hope

sperare

sper-

sperato

hoped

 

For the second group of action words, those ending in –ere, cut –ere and add –uto:

Infinitive

Root

Past participle

to believe

credere

cred-

creduto

believed

to be able to

potere

pot-

potuto

been able to

to know

sapere

sap-

saputo

known

 

And, finally, for the third group of action words, those ending in –ire, cut –ire and add –ito:

Infinitive

Root

Past participle

to feel

sentire

sent-

sentito

felt

to understand

capire

cap-

capito

understood

to sleep

dormire

dorm-

dormito

slept

 

Once you have the past participle, you can build the passato prossimo:

(io)

ho

amato

I

loved

(tu)

hai

amato

you

loved

(lui/lei)

ha

amato

he/she

loved

 

(noi)

abbiamo

amato

we

loved

(voi)

avete

amato

you

loved

(loro)

hanno

amato

they

loved

 

The following list shows you the past participles of 10 frequent action words. Combine ho-hai-ha | abbiamo-avete-hanno + a past participle and you get the passato prossimo. Only a few past participles are irregular.

Infinito

Passato prossimo

avere

to have

ho avuto

I had

fare

to make, to do

ho fatto*

I made, I did

dire

to say

ho detto*

I said

vedere

to see

ho visto*

I saw

dovere

to have to, must

ho dovuto

I had to, I must

volere

to want

ho voluto

I wanted

potere

can, to be able to

ho potuto

I could, I was able to

credere

to believe

ho creduto

I believed

parlare

to speak, to talk

ho parlato

I spoke, I talked

sapere

to know

ho saputo

I knew

* Irregular past participle

 

Ho avuto

Now take one action word at a time and build your sextet:

avere  to have

(io)

ho avuto

I

had

(tu)

hai avuto

you

had

(lui/lei)

ha avuto

he/she

had

(noi)

abbiamo avuto

we

had

(voi)

avete avuto

you

had

(loro)

hanno avuto

they

had

 

Combine ho avuto, etc. with tempo, fame, sete, ragione, paura, freddo:

(io)

Ho avuto tempo.

I had time.

(tu)

Hai avuto fame.

You were hungry.

(lui/lei)

Ha avuto sete.

He/She was thirsty.

(noi)

Abbiamo avuto ragione.

We were right.

(voi)

Avete avuto paura.

You were afraid.

(loro)

Hanno avuto freddo.

They were cold.

 

Ho fatto

fare  to do

(io)

ho fatto

I

did

(tu)

hai fatto

you

did

(lui/lei)

ha fatto

he/she

did

(noi)

abbiamo fatto

we

did

(voi)

avete fatto

you

did

(loro)

hanno fatto

they

did

 

Now combine ho fatto, etc. with una stupidaggine, un errore, un sogno, errori, una scelta, una risonanza magnetica:

(io)

Ho fatto una stupidaggine.

I did a silly thing.

(tu)

Hai fatto un errore.

You made a mistake.

(lui/lei)

Ha fatto un sogno.

He/She had a dream.

(noi)

Abbiamo fatto errori.

We made mistakes.

(voi)

Avete fatto una scelta.

You made a choice.

(loro)

Hanno fatto una risonanza magnetica.

They did an MRI.

 

Ho detto

dire  to say

(io)

ho detto

I

said

(tu)

hai detto

you

said

(lui/lei)

ha detto

he/she

said

(noi)

abbiamo detto

we

said

(voi)

avete detto

you

said

(loro)

hanno detto

they

said

 

Now combine ho detto, etc. with di sì, di no, una bugia, una stupidaggine, una cazzata, una sola parola:

(io)

Ho detto di sì.

I said yes.

(tu)

Hai detto di no.

You said no.

(lui/lei)

Ha detto una bugia.

He/She told a lie.

(noi)

Abbiamo detto una stupidaggine.

We said something stupid.

(voi)

Avete detto una cazzata (vulgar).

You said bullshit.

(loro)

Hanno detto una sola parola.

They said a single word.

 

Ho visto

vedere to see

(io)

ho visto

I

saw

(tu)

hai visto

you

saw

(lui/lei)

ha visto

he/she

saw

(noi)

abbiamo visto

we

saw

(voi)

avete visto

you

saw

(loro)

hanno visto

they

saw

 

Now combine ho visto, etc. with il ragazzo, la ragazza, la tigre, i due ragazzi, le due ragazze, il drago:

(io)

Ho visto il ragazzo.

I saw the boy.

(tu)

Hai visto la ragazza.

You saw the girl.

(lui/lei)

Ha visto la tigre.

He/She saw the tiger.

(noi)

Abbiamo visto i due ragazzi.

We saw the two boys.

(voi)

Avete visto le due ragazze.

You saw the two girls.

(loro)

Hanno visto il drago.

They saw the dragon.

 

To complete Section A, please take a sheet of paper and develop the sextets for volere, dovere, potere, credere, parlare and sapere. Examples:

ho voluto-hai voluto-ha voluto | abbiamo voluto-avete voluto– hanno voluto

ho potuto-hai potuto-ha potuto | abbiamo potuto-avete potuto– hanno potuto

 

Important note! We said earlier that the passato prossimo is the equivalent of the English imperfect tense (I loved, I studied, I worked). Alas, this is true only in part. Actually, in addition to the passato prossimo, you’ll need also the imperfetto. We’ll find out more about that in Level 8.

Second Important note! The past participle is a key element in Italian grammar. Would you repeat past participle 7 times, please? Past participle needs to be as familiar to you as milk, bread and butter.

Fare + andare

Some action words have an irregular present tense. It is important to know the ones that are frequently used. Today, let’s start with fare to do/make and andare to go.

fare  to do/make
I do, etc.
andare  to go
I go, etc.

io

faccio

vado

I

tu

fai

vai

you

lui/lei

fa

va

he/she

noi

facciamo

andiamo

we

voi

fate

andate

you

loro

fanno

vanno

they

 

C. Words

Technology

Some words, in particular those referring to current technology gadgets, should be familiar to you. Note the slightly different pronunciation.

l’internet

lo smartphone

la sim

il tablet

il computer

il mouse

l’account

Preview

In Level 3, you will find these words; please take a glance at them:

poco

little

poco da fare

little to do

Natale

Christmas

sicuramente

certainly

nuovo

new

molto

much

un’idea

an idea

può darsi

maybe

per lei

for her

brutto

ugly; bad

avere un brutto carattere

to be bad-tempered

amare

to love

sperare

to hope

studiare

to study

sapere

to know

credere

to believe

capire

to understand

dormire

to sleep

piccolo

small

una macchina

a car

un ragazzo

a boy, young man

simpatico

nice, pleasant

una ragazza

a girl, young woman

giovane

young

grande

big

una casa

a house

un lavoro

a job

prestigioso

prestigious

ancora

still

i nonni

the grandparents

una borsa di studio

a scholarship

un mestiere

a profession

immenso

huge

un successo

a success

un figlio

a son

una figlia

a daughter

solo

only

una vacanza

a vacation

breve

short

il capo

a boss

interessante

interesting

un successone

a huge success

un problema

a problem

meglio

better

proprio

here: really, exactly

una sfiga (colloquial)

bad luck

le palle (vulgar)

the balls

D. Rules

Negatives (2)

In Level 1, you used non to negate the meaning of a sentence. Now extend your knowledge to never/ever, nothing/anything, nobody/anything and no more/anymore. The procedure is simple: Keep the non in front of the action word and place mai, niente, nessuno and più after it.

Non ti amo.

I don’t love you.

Non lavora mai.

He/She never works.

Non sa niente.

He/She knows nothing.

Non vedete nessuno.

You don’t see anybody.

Non mi ami più.

You don’t love me anymore.

Non lo facciamo mai più.

We won’t do it again (“never anymore”).

 

In synthesis:

non

not

non … mai

never / ever

non … niente

nothing / anything

non … nessuno

nobody / anybody

non … più

no more / anymore

non … mai più

never again / ever again

non … più niente

nothing again / anything again

non … più nessuno

nobody again / anybody again

Things are slightly more complicated with compound tenses. With compound tenses such as the passato prossimo (avere + past participle, i.e., ho lavorato), non goes before the avere forms (and any optional personal pronoun mi, ti, lo, la, l’ etc.; more about personal pronouns in Level 6):

Non ho sentito.

I didn’t hear.

Non ti ho amato.

I didn’t love you.

 

Where will you place mai and più? In the presence of a past participle, mai and più go after avere and before the past participle:

Non ha mai lavorato.

He/She has never worked.

Non mi hai più aiutato.

You haven’t helped me anymore.

Non l’abbiamo mai più fatto.

We didn’t do it ever again (“never anymore”).

 

And where to place niente and nessuno? They always go after the past participle:

Non ha saputo niente.

He/She didn’t know anything.

Non avete visto nessuno?

Didn’t you see anybody?

 

These sentences sound complicated, right? Indeed, they do, but don’t worry. Eventually, after only weeks, you will become comfortable with them.

Asking a question

When you ask a question in English, you usually add do/did at the beginning of the sentence: Do you see this? Did you do this? In Italian, you don’t need anything of the kind. To transform the statement into a question, you just raise the pitch of your voice at the end of the sentence:

Statement:
Mi hai baciato.

You kissed me.

Question:
Mi hai
baciato?

Did you kiss me?

Statement:
È
arrivato solo adesso.

He’s come only now.
Question:
È
arrivato solo adesso?
Has he come only now?

 

See also these examples:

Non ti amo?

Don’t I love you?

Non lavora mai?

Doesn’t he ever work?

Non sa niente?

Doesn’t he know anything?

Non vedete nessuno?

Don’t you see anybody?

Non mi ami più?

Don’t you love me anymore?

Non lo facciamo mai più?

Won’t we ever do it again?

E. Dialogue

La macedonia di Amos

Amos’ fruit salad

Guarda la bella frutta che ha il signor Gianni. Sembra freschissima. Look at the beautiful fruit that Mr. Gianni has. It seems very fresh.
Davvero! Senti solo le fragole… You’re right! Just smell the strawberries!
Facciamo una macedonia! Let’s make a fruit salad!
Ottima idea! Quale frutta compriamo? Great idea! What fruit shall we buy?
Seguiamo la ricetta di Amos: due pezzi di tutto, frutta piccola, ananas e pinoli – e per finire, succo di arancia e limone a volontà. Let’s follow Amos’ recipe: two pieces of everything, small fruit, pineapple and pine nuts – and finally, orange juice and lemon to taste.
Cioè? Say that again?
Due mele, due pere, due banane, due kiwi e mezzo ananas, una piccola bustina di pinoli e 250 grammi di susine, d’uva e di albicocche. Two apples, two pears, two bananas, two kiwis and half a pineapple, a small packet of pine nuts and 250 grams of plums, grapes and apricots.
E le fragole? And strawberries?
Certo, anche le fragole. Evito solo melone e anguria – il melone perché ha un gusto molto forte e l’anguria perché è troppo acquosa. Tagliamo la frutta a pezzettini, la mescoliamo con quattro cucchiai di zucchero e mettiamo tutto nel frigorifero per trenta minuti. Alla fine, aggiungiamo il succo di quattro arance e di tre limoni e serviamo la macedonia con un gelato alla crema. Signor Gianni… Of course, also strawberries. I usually avoid putting in melon and watermelon – the melon because it has a very strong taste and the watermelon because it is too watery. We’ll cut the fruit into small pieces, mix it with four tablespoons of sugar and put everything in the fridge for thirty minutes. After that, we’ll add the juice of four oranges and three lemons and serve the fruit salad with vanilla ice cream. Mr. Gianni…
Buongiorno, Signorina Elisa. Che cosa desidera? Good morning, Miss Elisa. What would you like?
Salve. Vorrei preparare una bella macedonia. Ci servono due mele, due pere, due banane, una bustina di pinoli, 4 arance, 3 limoni… Hello. I would like to prepare a nice fruit salad. We need two apples, two pears, two bananas, a bag of pine nuts, 4 oranges, 3 lemons…

 

Words

la macedonia

fruit salad

di

of

guarda!

look!

che

which, that

il signor Gianni

Mr. Gianni

sembra

it seems

fresco/-a

fresh

freschissimo/-a

very/so fresh

davvero

indeed / really / you’re right

senti!

smell!

solo

only, just

il profumo

fragrance, scent

la fragola;
plurale: le fragole

strawberry

facciamo

we make; let’s make

ottimo/-a

great

l’idea

idea

quale

what, which

la frutta

fruit

compriamo

we buy / let’s buy

seguiamo

we follow / let’s follow

la ricetta

recipe

due

two

il pezzo;
plurale: i pezzi

piece

tutto

all, everything

piccolo/-a

small

l’ananas (m.)

pineapple

e

and

il pinolo;
plurale: i pinoli

pine nut

per finire

finally

il succo

juice

l’arancia

orange

il limone

lemon

a volontà

to taste; at will

cioè?

say that again!
that is to say?

la mela

apple

la pera

pear

la banana

banana

il kiwi

kiwi

mezzo

half

uno, una

a

la bustina

small packet

il grammo

gram

la susina

plum

l’uva

grape

l’albicocca

apricot

certo

of course

anche

also

evito

I avoid

il melone

melon

l’anguria

watermelon

perché

because

il gusto

taste

molto

very

forte

strong

troppo

too

acquoso/-a

watery

tagliamo

we cut

a pezzettini

into small pieces

mescoliamo

we mix

con

with

quattro

four

il cucchiaio;
plurale: i cucchiai

tablespoon

mettiamo

we put

il frigorifero

fridge

nel frigorifero

in/into the fridge

il minuto

minute

per trenta minuti

for 30 minutes

la fine

end

alla fine

at the end

aggiungiamo

we add

tre

three

serviamo

we serve

il gelato

ice cream

un gelato alla crema

a vanilla ice cream

la signorina

young lady

che cosa?

what?

desidera?

what do you desire?

vorrei

I would like

preparare

to prepare

bello/-a

we need

ci servono

we need

F. Results & Preview

That’s it for Level 2. Do you remember all the words we shared with you? And can you say sono-sei-è | siamo-siete-sono?

Do you remember

avereho avuto

fareho fatto

direho detto

vedereho visto

volereho voluto

dovereho dovuto

potereho potuto

credereho creduto

parlareho parlato

sapereho saputo

Do you know the meaning of mai, niente, nessuno and più? And, most importantly: Will you remember Amos’ fruit salad recipe forever?

Well then, you have been promoted to Level 3!

*  *  *

In Level 3, you’ll find the third and last part of the action word avere. Be prepared for the worst because the complete picture of one single Italian action word is shocking, at least at the beginning. There’s one piece of reassuring news, though: we won’t ask you to learn everything we show you.

Are you ready for Level 3? Fasten your seatbelt!